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Truck Driving Jobs: The #1 Mistake by Shippers and Receivers

Jun
19,
2008
3

Driving a truck professionally can be a tormented vocation. Truck driving schools enjoy manipulating new students in believing that over the road truck driving is an easy, laid-back lifestyle. At times, perhaps it can be, but for the most part it is a stressful, aggravating way of life. There are hundreds of thousands of pick-ups and deliveries made every day by our truckers and if you ask them which shipper and receiver is usually the worst to deal with, the answer will nearly always be the Grocery Warehouses.

I have never understood the management team of the grocery warehouses. You would think that management, lower to upper, would comprehend the main principle of business management . . . take care of the customer. Dealing with a grocery warehouse, primarily delivering, is most often the truck driver’s worst nightmare. They purposely make you sit and wait for hours on end, and most often make you, the driver, perform the unloading.

Grocery warehouses are known for their over-powering, disrespectful and hateful attitudes. Many of them will treat the professional driver as something less than a dog. All you have to do is ask a driver that has been at it for a while . . . grocery warehouses are the worst! These little managers that run the operation enjoy the feeling of power over the driver. This is the only reason I can imagine . . . what other reason would cause a “manager” to treat truck drivers this way?

Thus, this is where the management of these grocery warehouses are making their biggest mistake in managing. They may have the title of “management,” but they are not true, professional managers. What is the #1 mistake enacted by these shippers and receivers? They see these men and women truck drivers as nothing but “lower-class.” They treat them unfairly and many times with hostility. They abuse their management “powers” by making them sit and wait for hours on end, will take seven hours to unload a one hour shipment, and on and on.

This is where these so called “managers” are making their #1 mistake. These men and women of trucking may just be “truck drivers,” but they are also something else . . . they are CUSTOMERS! If every truck driver who has been treated badly by these grocery warehouses would stop shopping at the particular store, and their spouse stopped, along with their “two” kids, that would be a loss of four CUSTOMERS. Multiply this by 200 other drivers, spouses and “two” kids, customer loss would run up to 800! If each of these told a friend to stop buying from these hateful shippers and receivers, they would witness a customer loss of 1600! And . . . well, you get the picture.

A true, professional manager understands that the sole priority of a business is to make a profit. To do this, takes the customer. Without customers, a business fails. Is the customer always right? No . . . but when a company or corporation employs “managers” who fail to understand that even the lowly “truck driver” is a customer, they are no manager at all.

© 2008, Allen Smith. All rights reserved.

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By: Allen Smith

Allen Smith is a 37 year veteran who started at an early age in a household goods family moving business. He began driving straight trucks in 1977 and moved to the big rigs in 1982. His experience within the industry includes; owner operator, company driver, operations manager, and owner of a long distance HHG moving business, taking many of the long haul moves himself when needed. Allen Smith, a truck driver advocate who is driven by the desire to help others succeed within an industry where injustice, unrewarded sacrifice, and lack of respect and recognition exists. Allen and his wife Donna are hosts of Truth About Trucking ”Live” on Blog Talk Radio. Other websites include AskTheTrucker, TruckingSocialMedia, NorthAmericanTruckingALerts, TruthAboutTrucking, and many Social Media websites. In 2011 Allen and Donna hosted the first Truck Driver Social Media Convention, designed to create unity and solutions for the trucking industry. This is now being extended through the North American Trucking Alerts network as those within the industry join forces for the betterment of the industry. Allen strongly supports other industry advocates who are also stepping up to the plate to help those who share honesty, guidance and direction. He believes that all those involved in trucking need to be accountable for their part within the industry, including drivers, carriers, brokers, shippers, receivers, etc… The list of supporters and likeminded people grow daily, networking together and sharing thoughts and ideas for the betterment of trucking. He has coined the popular phrase "Raising the standards of the trucking industry"

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3 Responses to Truck Driving Jobs: The #1 Mistake by Shippers and Receivers. - Post a Comment

  1. Timothy Whitsett

    I worked for The Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company for 16 years as a driver. Grocery warehouses can be pretty tough on the people that keep their products moving. Mainly drivers.

  2. admin

    Thanks for your response Timothy:

    I ran reefer for three years with Core Carrier Corp. out of Kansas City, KS. They were one of the BEST companies I have ever worked for……but running grocery warehouses for so long, simply WORE ME OUT!! They treat the driver terribly! thanks, Allen

  3. Phil

    I’m sure running for the grocery warehouses is a rough job. Our site can help you find the best job offer available. You simply fill out our free application, trucking companies will send you their offers, and you pick the best one. It doesn’t cost you a dime, and it could get you into a higher paying and less stressful job.

    Truck Driver Jobs

    Truck driving jobs listed with US trucking companies. Company drivers and owner operators can review carrier profiles for trucking employment opportunities.

    http://www.hiringtruckdrivers.com

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